Entertainment » Movies

The Seasoning House

by Ken Tasho
Contributor
Tuesday Dec 10, 2013
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The indie thriller "The Seasoning House" is one of the most artfully directed revenge films this reviewer has ever seen.

Starting way back in the ’70s with films like "Last House on the Left" and "I Spit on Your Grave," the rape/revenge genre has come a long way from its low-budget roots. "The Seasoning House" belongs in that category, yet the acting and production values are a step above.

The plot involves a young girl named Angel (Rosie Day), who in 1996 is kidnapped and brought to an all-female brothel. She becomes the slave to Viktor (Kevin Howarth) and befriends her fellow captors. The deaf and mute Angel concocts a plan to turn the tables on her kidnappers, by hiding in the walls of the house.

The first hour of "The Seasoning House" is the best, featuring a slow-moving atmosphere where the audience gets to know the characters. Then the movie turns brutal, unbearably showing Angel getting her revenge.

One small problem with the film is the pair of rape scenes, filmed in a strangely erotic way instead of being horrific. This distracts from an otherwise thoughtful and engrossing story.

"The Making of the Seasoning House" is a too-brief 15-minute behind-the-scenes featurette. The viewer is taken on set of the film, and it shows how actress Rosie Day makes her way through the mazes and crawlspaces seen in the film. Director Paul Hyett talks about his directorial debut here, the casting process, and how the film came to fruition. Just as the documentary becomes captivating, it ends all too suddenly.

A trailer for "The Seasoning House" is also included in the Blu-ray.


"The Seasoning House"
Blu-ray
$29.98
www.wellgousa.com

Ken Tasho is a Corporate Drone by day and Edge Contributor by night. He has a love for all things ’80’s and resides in the Wayland Square area of Providence, RI...but would much rather be sharing an apartment in NYC with ’80’s rock goddesses Pat Benatar and Deborah Harry.

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