Entertainment » Movies

Ginger & Rosa

by Louise Adams
Tuesday Jul 23, 2013
  • PRINT
  • COMMENTS (0)
  • LARGE
  • MEDIUM
  • SMALL

Sally Potter offers her usual gorgeously saturated tableaux in her latest film, "Ginger & Rosa," a tale of two teens weathering the Cold War.

Set in the post-modern tenements of East London, Ginger (red-headed Elle Fanning), is so into her childhood friend Rosa (director Jane Campion’s daughter Alice Englert) that disappointment is inevitable, and the relationship comes crashing down.

The two dress alike - doffing the same fishermen’s sweaters, bathtub-shrunk skinny jeans and kohl eyeliner - as they skip school and hitchhike to join the youth brigade of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament on the brink of the Bay of Pigs. They liken church to theater, and have complicated relationships with their also-struggling parents.

The cinematic explorations of the color red are rich, from the girls’ names to Ginger’s luminous orange locks, to the cherries at the end of Rosa’s cigarettes as she goes off to fuck strangers.

The pace is slow, and the accents are mostly muddy. The best work is by Timothy Spall and Oliver Platt as Ginger’s gay godparents (although their scenes are sparse and strange), and Annette Bening as their visiting friend, a bespectacled American activist and poetess, rather, poet.

The cinematic explorations of the color red are rich, from the girls’ names to Ginger’s luminous orange locks, to the cherries at the end of Rosa’s bummed cigarettes as she goes off to fuck strangers (and some not-so-strange) while Ginger reads T.S. Eliot or plays perfect period music like Brubeck’s "Take Five."

Special features include Potter’s audio commentary, deleted scenes, cast interviews, and the featurettes "Anatomy of a Scene" and "The Making of," which offers an intriguing meta-take on the behind-the-scenes genre.


"Ginger & Rosa"
DVD
$14.83

Louise Adams is a writer, actor, educator, yogini and nom de guerre. @MzzzAnthrope

Comments

Add New Comment

Comments on Facebook