Entertainment » Movies

The Lone Ranger

by Jake Mulligan
Contributor
Tuesday Dec 17, 2013
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One of the most lambasted films of the year is also one of the most interesting. "The Lone Ranger" is, on paper, a stunningly subversive idea: An almost anti-American spaghetti western financed by Disney into the deep nine figures. Director Gore Verbinski doesn’t ditch the titular hero’s square naiveté, he just builds a menacing world around it.

The Blu-ray release doesn’t offer much to expound on this exceptionally curious summer actioner. There’s a short, unfinished deleted scene on the disc (presented with the help of storyboards), along with a set of bloopers. The final extra features are about a half-hour’s worth of behind-the-scenes featurettes, detailing the actor’s "cowboy boot camp," the on-location shooting, and the complexly-produced train-set action sequences.

"The Lone Ranger" is a flawed picture, but considering the admirably skewed vision offered within its frames, those flaws become easy to forgive.

The film’s unheralded daring more than makes up for the dearth of extras. While the middle section indeed plods along, this is an astoundingly dark picture: A film where the bad guys are wealthy white men, and where Native Americans knowingly charge into their own deaths, mourning the state of the culture that had inhabited their land.

The big moment of triumph for Armie Hammer’s Lone Ranger -- the moment when his iconic theme song first appears, in fact -- comes when he turns his gun on a group of Union soldiers and begins to fire at them, indiscriminately, explicitly killing many of them. "The Lone Ranger" is a flawed picture, but considering the admirably skewed vision offered within its frames, those flaws become easy to forgive.

"The Lone Ranger"
Blu-ray/DVD/Digital Copy Pack
Disney.com
$39.99

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