Technology » Science

1 thru 15 of 1937 Stories
Tossed Net Captures Space Junk in Orbit-Cleanup Experiment

Tossed Net Captures Space Junk in Orbit-Cleanup Experiment

By Marcia Dunn | Sep 24
A tossed net has managed to capture space junk in a demonstration of ways to clean up debris in orbit.

Researchers Say They're Closing in on Captain Cook's Ship

Researchers Say They're Closing in on Captain Cook's Ship

By Jennifer McDermott | Sep 24
Researchers are exploring whether a shipwreck off the coast of Rhode Island could be the vessel that 18th-century explorer Capt. James Cook used to sail around the world.

Japan Space Rovers Lowered to Asteroid to Collect Data

Japan Space Rovers Lowered to Asteroid to Collect Data

By Mari Yamaguchi | Sep 23
A Japanese spacecraft released two small rovers on an asteroid on Friday in a mission that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system.

Memory's Frailty May Be Playing Role in Kavanaugh Matter

Memory's Frailty May Be Playing Role in Kavanaugh Matter

By Malcolm Ritter | Sep 22
It's possible that both Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford — the woman who says a drunken Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed and groped her at a party when they were teenagers in the early 1980s — believe what they say.

Bye Bye Bugs? Scientists Fear Non-Pest Insects Are Declining

Bye Bye Bugs? Scientists Fear Non-Pest Insects Are Declining

By Seth Borenstein | Sep 21
A staple of summer — swarms of bugs — seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried.

Canadian Crabs with Bad Attitude Threaten Coastal Ecosystem

Canadian Crabs with Bad Attitude Threaten Coastal Ecosystem

By David Sharp | Sep 20
Canadians are known as friendly folks, but these crabby brutes migrating from Canadian waters are better suited for the hockey rink.

Bye Bye Bugs? Scientists Fear Non-Pest Insects Are Declining

Bye Bye Bugs? Scientists Fear Non-Pest Insects Are Declining

By Seth Borenstein | Sep 20
A staple of summer — swarms of bugs — seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried.

Few Safeguards for Foster Kids on Psych Drugs

Few Safeguards for Foster Kids on Psych Drugs

By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar | Sep 19
Thousands of children in foster care may be getting powerful psychiatric drugs prescribed to them without basic safeguards, according to a federal watchdog's investigation that finds a failure to care for youngsters whose lives have already been disrupted

Scientists: World's Warming; Expect More Intense Hurricanes

Scientists: World's Warming; Expect More Intense Hurricanes

By Seth Borenstein | Sep 18
A warmer world makes for nastier hurricanes. Scientists say they are wetter, possess more energy and intensify faster.

Experts: Mayan Altar Hints At Ancient Intrigue

Experts: Mayan Altar Hints At Ancient Intrigue

Sep 18
An altar found at Guatemala's La Corona site suggests the Mayan dynasty of Kaanul, known as the Snake Kings, acted like its namesake in slowly squeezing the rival kingdom of Tikal, archaeologists said Friday.

Boss Revenge, Self-Colonoscopy Studies Win 2018 Ig Nobels

Boss Revenge, Self-Colonoscopy Studies Win 2018 Ig Nobels

By Mark Pratt | Sep 17
The prizes at the 28th annual ceremony at Harvard University were being handed out by real Nobel laureates.

SpaceX Plans to Send Tourists Around the Moon

SpaceX Plans to Send Tourists Around the Moon

By Marcia Dunn | Sep 17
SpaceX said it has signed the first private moon traveler, with some changes to its original game plan.

NASA Satellite Launched to Measure Earth's Ice Changes

NASA Satellite Launched to Measure Earth's Ice Changes

Sep 16
A NASA satellite designed to precisely measure changes in Earth's ice sheets, glaciers, sea ice and vegetation was launched into polar orbit from California early Saturday.

Lab Test May Identify Dangerous Gene Mutations, Study Finds

Lab Test May Identify Dangerous Gene Mutations, Study Finds

By Malcolm Ritter | Sep 16
Scientists say they've found a new way to help determine whether specific genetic abnormalities are likely to make people sick, a step toward avoiding a vexing uncertainty that can surround DNA test results.

#Ancient? Crisscrossed Lines Called World's Oldest Drawing

#Ancient? Crisscrossed Lines Called World's Oldest Drawing

By Malcolm Ritter | Sep 16
It looks a bit like a hashtag, but it's 73,000 years old. And scientists say this tiny sketch found in a South African cave is the oldest known drawing.

1 thru 15 of 1937 Stories